Post-Election 2012

Well, thankfully, the election is now over, and we can all return to the more pressing issue of actually living our own lives, versus bashing people we know and don’t know based on their political choices. Of course, for a few days, people on Face Book, Twitter, and other various social media outlets are now going to be celebrating their choice, or pointing fingers at those who didn’t vote the way they thought they should. Any cause for drama seems to be good enough for people to jump all over each other.

Realistically, does who wins the presidency really affect me, personally? Does it matter if I’m lower class, middle class or upper class? My baby sister told me that all kinds of programs were going to disappear if Romney won the election. One of those programs is the disability benefits for Veterans. Ok, I get that. I am a disabled veteran and I do get a monthly benefit. My sister is a disabled veteran. My father is a disabled veteran. 2012 was the first time in the last four years that there was an increase in the amount that we receive. I can’t speak for my sister or my dad, but that monthly amount, while it may help with the grocery bill, is not going to help me survive. She also told me that the welfare program would disappear. Ok. To be perfectly honest, I accept the fact that there are legitimate cases of people needing assistance from welfare. However, I think there are far too many cases of that system being abused by people looking for a free handout.

And there is the root of the problem. Free handouts. I don’t care if you were born here, if you’re here illegally, if you’re here legally…what makes you think you are ENTITLED to anything that you didn’t work for? I have worked and paid taxes since I was 16 years old. My very first tax-paying job was working for the town during the summer, keeping stats for the Summer League Basketball Team. From that job forward, I have had a myriad of other jobs. I worked in a shoe factory, I cut meat in a deli, I’ve worked in retail, property management, I cleaned office buildings, I moved furniture, I’ve held administrative/clerical jobs, AND I was in the United States Army. I didn’t once look for a handout from the government. I quit my job in July 2012. Yes, I filed an unemployment claim. I’ve also paid into unemployment insurance for the last 22 years. My claim was denied.  Am I sitting at home crying about the injustice of it? No! I’m working on building a business. I’m working on personal development. I’m taking care of my family.

That brings me back to the election. So many people complain about those running our country, and what they’re doing to screw over the little people, the big people, the small businesses, the big businesses…I’m tired of listening to it. My Facebook post today was, I think, the first reference I’ve made to the election. This is what it said:

Day 7: I’m thankful that the election is over. Perhaps now we can put our political differences behind us, and start working together to build the country we are looking for. It starts at home, not at the White House. 
“Prosper where you are planted” – Dani Johnson

It starts at home. Pay attention to what you are doing in your own home, in your own life, community, town, state. Pay attention to what you are teaching your children, through your actions and your words. Washington isn’t going to fix our lives, regardless of who is in the White House. It’s up to us to fix our own lives. I know we have freedom of speech, but really, if people can’t get a handle on their own lives and situations, what gives anyone the right to judge or criticize the way elected officials are running our country?